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Replace Your Vital Documents

Fortunately, you can replace most important personal records. Use these links as a starting point.

  • Address Change  – When you move, be sure to change your address with the Post Office, IRS, and other government agencies, so that you'll continue to receive mail and any government benefits at your new location.
  • Birth, Marriage, and Death Certificates  – Get records based on the location of the birth, death, marriage, or divorce.
  • Damaged Money  – The Treasury Department will exchange mutilated or damaged U.S. currency.
  • Drivers' Licenses and Vehicle Registration  – Find your state's motor vehicle department to get or replace your driver's license, and register your car.
  • Federal Civilian Personnel Records  – Go to the National Archives website for guidance on requesting personnel records for former federal civilian employees. Current federal workers can get personnel records from their human resources office.
  • Green Card Replacement  – Get instructions on how to replace a lost, stolen, or damaged permanent resident card (green card).
  • Medicare Card Replacement  – Learn how to replace a lost, stolen, or damaged Medicare card.
  • Military Service Records  – Get copies of military service records, to prove military service or to research genealogy.
  • Passport  – Report your lost or stolen passport immediately. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate if your passport is lost or stolen overseas.
  • Replace a Savings Bond  – Replace lost, stolen, or destroyed paper savings bonds.
  • Saving Family Treasures  – The National Archives provides guidelines for the care for some of the more common materials affected by natural disasters or other emergencies.
  • School Records  – Contact your former school or the appropriate school district if the school has closed.
  • Social Security Card Replacement  – Learn how to replace your lost or stolen Social Security card.
  • Tax Return  – Request a copy of your federal tax return from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

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