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Halloween

On Halloween—October 31—many American children dress up in funny or scary costumes and go "trick or treating" by knocking on doors in their neighborhood. The neighbors are expected to respond by giving them candy or other small gifts. Children and adults also might celebrate Halloween with costume parties.


Halloween Safety

  • Child Pedestrian Safety on Halloween
    Children are four times more likely to be in fatal pedestrian accidents on Halloween than on any other night of the year.
  • Decorative Contact Lenses – How to Buy Them Safely
    Decorative contact lenses are prescription devices that should only be purchased from authorized distributors. Using over-the-counter lenses could lead to eye damage or even blindness. Learn how to buy and use decorative contact lenses safely.
  • Halloween Food Safety
    Party food safety advice from the manager of the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline.
  • Halloween Food Safety Tips
    Steps to help your children have a safe Halloween, and tips for Halloween parties, from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
  • Halloween Health and Safety Tips
    Tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for trick-or-treaters and party guests.
  • Halloween Safety Tips
    Stay safe this Halloween with safety tips from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. (PDF)
  • Makeup Safety
    Help keep your fun from leaving you with a rash, swollen eyelids, or other grief.
  • Reduce Halloween Candy Overload
    Do you want to stop children from eating too much candy this Halloween? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers tips—like giving out stickers, toys, or bubbles instead of candy, and trading a toy or extra allowance for your children's candy.
  • Stay Safe and Healthy This Halloween
    Ideas for safe costumes, healthy treats, safe trick-or-treating, and staying active this Halloween, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Halloween Facts and Fun

  • Halloween Around the World
    Festivals commemorating the dead can be found in many cultures. Learn more from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Halloween at the White House
    Photos of White House Halloween festivities from years past.
  • Halloween by the Numbers
    How many millions of pounds of pumpkins are produced each year in the U.S.? And how many pounds of candy does an American eat annually? The U.S. Census Department knows.
  • Halloween Capital of the World
    Did you know that Halloween has a capital? Find out where, from the Library of Congress.

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Especially for Kids

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History of Halloween

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Halloween Recipes

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