U.S. History and Historical Documents

Learn more about the history of the United States.

American History

The history of the United States is vast and complex, but can be broken down into moments and time periods that divided, unified, and changed the United States into the country it is today:


  • The American Revolution (sometimes referred to as the American War of Independence or the Revolutionary War) was a conflict which lasted from 1775-1783 and allowed the original thirteen colonies to remain independent from Great Britain.
  • Beginning in Great Britain in the late 1790s, the Industrial Revolution eventually made its way to the United States and changed the focus of our economy and the way we manufacture products.


  • In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson agreed to the Louisiana Purchase, successfully adding 530,000,000 acres of land to the United States. The area was purchased from France for $15 million. The following year, President Jefferson assigned Meriwether Lewis (who asked for help from William Clark) to head west and explore the newly purchased land. It took about a year and a half for the duo to reach the west coast.
  • The American Civil War divided the United States in two – the Northern States versus the Southern States. This four year battle (1861-1865) kept the United States together as one whole nation and ended slavery.


  • On December 17, 1903 brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright became the first people to maintain a controlled flight in a powered, heavier-than-air machine. The Wright Flyer only flew for 12 seconds for a distance of 120 feet, but their technology would change the modern world forever.
  • On April 6, 1917 the United States entered World War I by declaring war on Germany.
  • After nearly 100 years of protests, demonstrations, and sit-ins, women of the United States were officially granted the right to vote after the 19th Amendment was ratified on August 26, 1920.
  • The worst economic crisis to happen in the United States occurred when the stock market crashed in October 1929 resulting in the Great Depression.  
  • On June 1, 1937, Amelia Earhart set out to become to first woman to fly around the world (a 29,000-mile trip). Earhart (and her navigator Fred Noonan) only made it to Howland Island in the Pacific Ocean before mysteriously disappearing. The whereabouts of Earhart, Noonan, and the plane are still unknown.
  • World War II officially begins in September 1939 after Germany invades Poland. The United States didn’t enter the war until after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
  • On August 6 and August 9 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, effectively ending World War II.  
  • After World War II, an agreement was reached to divide Korea into two parts: a northern half to be controlled by the Soviet Union and a southern half to be controlled by the United States. The division was originally meant as a temporary solution, but the Soviet Union managed to block elections that were held to elect someone to unify to country. Instead, the Soviet Union sent North Korean troops across the 38th parallel leading to the three-year long (1950-1953) Korean War
  • From 1954-1968, the African-American Civil Rights movement took place, especially in the Southern states. Fighting to put an end to racial segregation and discrimination, the movement resulted in the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and the 1968 Fair Housing Act.
  • The Vietnam War was a nearly 20 year battle (November 1, 1955 - April 30 1975) between North Vietnam and South Vietnam. North Vietnam won the war and Vietnam became one unified country.
  • The Apollo 11 mission (July 16 – 24 1969) allowed United States astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin to become the first humans to step on the moon’s surface.


Library of Congress Resources

The Library of Congress has compiled a list of historical events for each day of the year, titled "This Day in History". The website is updated daily and visitors can view the previous day's history as well as whatever documents, pictures, or outside information is available for each historical event. 

The American History section of the Library of Congress is separated by time period or subject and offers an in-depth look into the history of the United States. 

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Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence is one of the most important documents in the history of the United States.

To learn more, you may want to:

Fast Facts

  • It took Thomas Jefferson 17 days to write the Declaration of Independence.
  • On July 2, 1776, Congress voted to declare independence from Great Britain.
  • On July 4, 1776, Congress voted to accept the Declaration of Independence, marking July 4 as Independence Day.

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The U.S. National Anthem

The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States of America. To celebrate a victory over British forces during the War of 1812, U.S. soldiers raised a large American flag at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland on September 14, 1814. Inspired by those events, Francis Scott Key wrote a poem called "Defence of Fort M'Henry", which eventually became the Star Spangled Banner and the United States national anthem. 

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U.S. Constitution

The foundation of the American Government, its purpose, form, and structure are in the Constitution of the United States. The Constitutional Convention adopted the Constitution on September 17, 1787.  

The Bill of Rights are the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. It guarantees greater constitutional protection for individual liberties and lists specific prohibitions on government power. There are 27 Constitutional Amendments to the Bill of Rights. The 27th Amendment, which was originally proposed in 1789, wasn't ratified until 1992.  

Where to View the Constitution

You can view the original, parchment copy of the Constitution at the National Archives Building. You can also view an online copy of the U.S. Constitution or order a printed copy of the Constitution.

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